• Time for Greenbriar’s Greens to Grow!

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    Today, Emergent Structures officially handed over the keys for the Greenbriar garden shed to Gena Taylor, the Executive Director of the Greenbriar Children’s Center! The day was marked by the installation of the Emergent Structures plaque which reveals the history of the reclaimed materials that the garden shed was built from.

    Materials for this project came from many sources, including a sound stage for the second SpongBob Movie, our Materialanthropists Debra and Chuck Caldwell, and our latest Materialanthropist Stratton Leopold, movie producer extraordinaire and owner of Leopold’s Ice Cream. For a complete list of the material history, please see the bottom of this post.

    This project, funded by a generous community grant from Gulfstream,was a first exploration into providing mentorship to a collaborative effort between students at SCAD and Savannah Technical Collge. Ethan Weyrick, a recent SCAD Masters of Architecture alum, designed and managed the construction of the Greenbriar shed, while students in Steve Hartley’s construction technology class pre-fabricated the walls, and contributed to the on-site construction.

    The mentorship was coordinated by founding board member Mark Fitzpatrick. In the image below, the strong women of Greenbriar gather by the shed. We are very proud to have contributed to Greenbriar’s mission of promoting the healthy development of children and the strengthening of families

    All photos by Arianna Gianakopoulos, MA Design for Sustainability student at SCAD. Thank you, Ari!

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    MATERIAL HISTORY OF THE GREENBRIAR GARDEN SHED:

    ORIGINS OF THE CEDAR SIDING:  In 1866, George Ash built the house that stands at 223 E. Jones Street, in Savannah’s Historic District. The house was built for James Graybill. In 1880, Mrs. Charles Green purchased the house for a home for orphans called the Minnie Mansion. In the 1970s, the interior of the entire house was covered with cedar shiplap siding, and the basement was covered in yellow pine. The house was purchased in 2010 by Chuck and Debra Caldwell, who participated in Emergent Structures’ Materialanthropy program in 2012, when the materials were removed, prepared and used for numerous community projects, including this garden shed.

    ORIGINS OF THE STUDS: In autumn 2013, The SpongeBob Movie: Sponge Out of Water was filmed in various Savannah locations, including Tybee Island, Broughton Street and a temporary sound stage on Montgomery Street. Savannah movie producer Stratton Leopold (and Emergent Materialanthropist) arranged for leftover stage materials to be donated to Emergent Structures for use in this garden shed.

    ORIGINS OF THE REDWOOD TRIM: The redwood used for the shed trim was reclaimed from Carlstedt’s Wholesale Flowers on 37th and Pine Street which was renovated in 2014 to become the production shop for Leopold’s Ice Cream.

    ORIGINS OF OTHER MATERIALS: The wood used for the roof trusses and roof also came from the 37th and Pine renovation of Leopold’s Ice Cream. The door and window were reclaimed by Southern Pine Company from buildings in Savannah.

  • One World brings Solar Power to E.34

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    One World Sustainable has delivered the sun to the E. 34 greenhouse!

    One World VP Keith Freeman, a long-time friend of Emergent Structures, joined his son, Jake, in installing just under 1 kW of solar photovoltaic panels on the roof of the greenhouse so we can run the lights and the exhaust fan with renewable energy. We are so grateful to One World Sustainable for their generous donation of the panels, hardware and racking, as well as the full cost of installation. THANK YOU, One World!

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  • Farm Cart Anyone?

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    As with our Greenbriar Garden Shed, the latest Emergent Structures project aims to serve the Savannah community through a unique collaborative experience between SCAD and Savannah Tech students. Made possible by a generous grant from Gulfstream, our 2015 community collaboration project focuses on the needs that local farmers have while transporting their goods from their farm to local farmer’s markets, and specifically to the Forsyth Farmer’s Market.

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  • Setting the Table for Success

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    Jobs needed one.
    Gates needed one.
    Even Alexander Graham Bell needed one.

    Without a table to work on, there’s not an entrepreneur in history who could’ve gotten their idea off the ground (bad pun intended). So, when Emergent Structures and The Creative Coast started talking about ways we could collaborate to support Savannah’s entrepreneurial community, making tables for new business start-ups at the Creators’s Foundry seemed like an idea with legs. And Emergent has just the materials for the job!

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  • Larger than Our Direct Impacts

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    A bad solution acts within the larger pattern the way a disease or addiction acts within the body. A good solution acts within the larger pattern the way a healthy organ acts within the body.

    —Wendell Berry

    Emergent Structures continues to work with a vigilant eye toward what Wendell Berry has called solving for pattern, or seeking to devise interventions that ripple positively through the system in which they’re enacted. There is not a single project we have initiated or facilitated that did not consciously include an exploration of what negative or other positive consequences of our actions might result.

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  • TED Talking about Bottom Feeders

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    This past weekend, Emergent Structures president Scott Boylston gave a TED Talk at Furman University on the need for technological bottom feeders in contemporary society, and the work that Emergent Structures is doing in reclaiming building materials and rebuilding communities. Thank you to the organizers for putting together a great event! We’ll let you know when the video is posted online.

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  • Our Biggest Fan (installation)

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    The checklist is getting shorter and shorter! Today’s accomplishments: Install our biggest fan ever, pour cement for the north and east door thresholds, and caulk the roofing. Then, off to enjoy the rest of the beautiful day.

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  • Finishing the Doors: Opening the Doors… Soon!

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    With the completion of both sliding barn doors, today marks the day when the envelope on the E.34 Greenhouse was completed! A great volunteer team came out and put in a whole day, and we’re now closer to finishing this magnificent greenhouse for Design for Ability than ever before. We aren’t quite at the punch list, but lordy, lordy, we sure are close; some of the plant shelving was brought in today.

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  • Savannah Rails: Not Waste

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    We’re not going to tell you everything. We can tell you this: there will be tables.

    Here’s our formula: Divert waste streams from two major international corporations, add rebar reclaimed from some of our own construction sites, and add new casters to get things rolling. Viola.

    We’re calling them Savannah Rails: Not Waste, (SR:NW for short). Master blacksmith and furniture maker Aaron Heisler of Pique Studios prototyped the design. Thanks to his incredible craftsmanship and impeccable design sensibilities, it’s more beautiful that we ever imagined it would be.

    Stay tuned for more.

  • If Eyes are the Windows to the Soul, So are Windows

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    By Scott Boylston

    One hundred and eighty years.
    Seventy one years.
    Five years.
    Two years.
    What will the next time span reveal?

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